Malware is worse than we thought: 3 things you need to do right now

In his article “The Untold Story of Notpetya, the Most Devastating Cyberattack in History,” Andy Greenberg shares how a single piece of code threw corporations and government agencies into utter chaos.

In 2017, Russia launched devastating malware as a form of cyberwarfare against Ukraine, affecting companies as far as A.P. Møller-Maersk in Copenhagen. The resulting technological disaster this shipping company experienced was a bad case of collateral damage.

To make things worse, Maersk had a number of problems in its I.T. security that did not help prevent this cyberattack. The company did not have the proper protection between the various offices and was using outdated and unpatched servers.

The worst mistake? Solely relying on online backups without having any offline protection for the servers.

When the malware hit, it wiped out all servers and their backups simultaneously.

As we can see, malware is more distressing than we thought. With governments behind some of the largest cyberattacks, no one is completely protected—not even big companies.

To avoid the chaos Maersk experienced, here are 3 things to do right now:

  • Make a backup of your most important data and store it on a hard drive that is not connected to anything. Having an offline backup is the most reliable solution for these worst-case scenarios.
  • Have your I.T. firm do a server “image backup” to get your server back and running after a security breach and cyberattack.
  • Get a security audit done on your company network to discover those issues that need to be fixed and patched.

Nonlinear Tech can help you check all of these things off your list, all while providing personalized services that satisfy your needs and build a close working relationship.

Let us help you do these 3 things, and you will be one step further in building a secure foundation around your servers.

Read Greenberg’s article at the following link: https://www.wired.com/story/notpetya-cyberattack-ukraine-russia-code-crashed-the-world/